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UNU-WIDER Linking Globalization to Poverty

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A teenager wears torn rubber boots in a muddy local market in Bac Ha, Viet Nam. As of 2005 figures, half the world population—more than 3 billion people–is estimated to live on less than USD 2.50 a day. Bac Ha, Viet Nam. UN Photo/Kibae Park.

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Linking Globalization to Poverty

While the economic opportunities offered by globalization can be large, a question is often raised as to whether the actual distribution of gains is fair, in particular, whether the poor benefit less than proportionately from globalization and could under some circumstances be hurt by it. This Policy Brief summarizes and examines the various channels and transmission mechanisms, such as greater openness to trade and foreign investment, economic growth, effects on income distribution, technology transfer and labour migration, through which the process of globalization affects different dimensions of poverty in the developing world.
Publisher:
UNU-WIDER
Series:
UNU Policy Brief
Volume:
02/2007
Title:
Linking Globalization to Poverty
Authors:
Machiko Nissanke and Erik Thorbecke
Publication date:
May 2007
ISSN Web:
1814-8026
ISBN 13 Print:
9789280830347
ISBN 13 Web:
9789280830354
Copyright holder:
© UNU
Copyright year:
2007
Keywords:
globalization, growth, inequality, poverty, pro-poor, distribution, labour mobility, capital, technology, vulnerability, institutions
JEL:
I32, F02
Project:
Impact of Globalization on the World's Poor
Sponsor:
The governments of Denmark (Royal Ministry of Foreign Affairs), Finland (Ministry for Foreign Affairs), Norway (Royal Ministry of Foreign Affairs), Sweden (Swedish International Development Cooperation Agency-Sida) and the United Kingdom (Department for International Development).
Format:
online and printed copies
 
Licensed under the Creative Commons Deed "Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 2.5"

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