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A teenager wears torn rubber boots in a muddy local market in Bac Ha, Viet Nam. As of 2005 figures, half the world population—more than 3 billion people–is estimated to live on less than USD 2.50 a day. Bac Ha, Viet Nam. UN Photo/Kibae Park.

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Linking Globalization to Poverty in Asia, Latin America and Africa

Despite the enormous potential of globalization in accelerating economic growth through greater integration into the world economy the impact of globalization on poverty reduction has been uneven. Asia has been the major beneficiary of globalization where high growth rates and its labor-intensive pattern contributed to a spectacular reduction in poverty. In contrast, the integration process in Latin America did not contribute to accelerating growth and employment and even led, in some instances, to an informalization of the labor force. In spite of opening up, the failure of sub-Saharan Africa to diversify and undergo structural transformation has led to the persistence of low growth and debilitating poverty. While the impact of globalization on poverty is context-specific, we argue that countries intent on benefitting from globalization need to adopt a pro-active stand in formulating regional and national strategies to enhance the potentially positive effects of globalization and moderate the negative effects.
Publisher:
UNU-WIDER
Series:
UNU Policy Brief
Volume:
03/2010
Title:
Linking Globalization to Poverty in Asia, Latin America and Africa
Authors:
Machiko Nissanke and Erik Thorbecke
Publication date:
April 2010
ISSN Web:
1814-8026
ISBN 13 Print:
978-92-808-3080-4
ISBN 13 Web:
978-92-808-3081-1
Copyright holder:
© UNU
Copyright year:
2010
Project:
Impact of Globalization on the World's Poor
Sponsor:
UNU-WIDER acknowledges the financial contributions to the research programme by the governments of Denmark (Royal Ministry of Foreign Affairs), Finland (Ministry for Foreign Affairs), Sweden (Swedish International Development Cooperation Agency—Sida) and the United Kingdom (Department for International Development).
Format:
online and printed copies
 
Licensed under the Creative Commons Deed "Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 2.5"