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UNU-WIDER Fragile States

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A teenager wears torn rubber boots in a muddy local market in Bac Ha, Viet Nam. As of 2005 figures, half the world population—more than 3 billion people–is estimated to live on less than USD 2.50 a day. Bac Ha, Viet Nam. UN Photo/Kibae Park.

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Fragile States

Many of the world’s poorest countries can be described as 'fragile states' wherein governments cannot or will not provide an environment for households to reduce, mitigate, or cope with poverty and other risks to wellbeing. Many of these states are in conflict or just emerging from conflict. The UNU-WIDER project 'Fragility and Development' explored state fragility and its relationship to household vulnerability, noting that there is a lack of research on the economic dimensions of conflict, aid, and development in fragile states. This Research Brief provides a summary of the various contributions made by this project, including case studies on Iraq, Kosovo, Palestine, and Somalia. It also addresses a number of pertinent questions such as; when are states fragile? What are the costs that fragile states impose on their people and the international community? Should the sovereignty of fragile states be reconsidered? And how can aid flows to fragile states be made more effective?
Publisher:
UNU Press
Series:
UNU Research Brief
Volume:
03/2008
Title:
Fragile States
Authors:
Wim Naudé, Amelia U. Santos-Paulino, and Mark McGillivray
Publication date:
December 2008
ISSN Web:
1816-5796
ISBN 13 Print:
9789280835106
ISBN 13 Web:
9789280835113
Copyright holder:
© United Nations University
Copyright year:
2008
Keywords:
fragility, failed states, failing states, poverty, well-being, Iraq, Kosovo, Palestine, Somalia
JEL:
F52, O19
Project:
Fragility and Development
Sponsor:
UNU-WIDER gratefully acknowledges the financial contributions to the project from the Australian Agency for International Development (AusAID) and the UK Department for International Development (DFID).
Format:
online and printed copies
 
Licensed under the Creative Commons Deed “Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 2.5”

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