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UNU-WIDER Is Internal Migration Bad for Receiving Urban Centres?

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WP/21 Is Internal Migration Bad for Receiving Urban Centres?

During the twentieth century, internal migration and urbanization shaped Brazil’s economic and social landscape. Cities grew tremendously, while immigration participated in the rapid urbanization process and the redistribution of poverty between rural and urban areas. In 1950, about a third of Brazil’s population lived in cities; this figure grew to approximately 80 per cent by the end of the nineteenth century. The Brazilian population redistributed unevenly—some dynamic regions became population magnets, and some neighbourhoods within cities became gateway clusters in which the effects of immigration proved particularly salient. This study asks, has domestic migration to cities been part of a healthy process of economic transition and mobility for the country and its households? Or has it been a perverse trap?
Publisher:
UNU-WIDER
Series:
WIDER Working Paper
Volume:
2011/21
Title:
WP/21 Is Internal Migration Bad for Receiving Urban Centres?
Authors:
Céline Ferré
Publication date:
April 2011
ISBN 13 Web:
978-92-9230-384-6
Copyright holder:
© UNU-WIDER
Copyright year:
2011
Keywords:
urbanization, migration, mobility, poverty, households, Brazil
JEL:
R2, O54, N96
Project:
Development in an Urban World
Sponsor:
UNU-WIDER gratefully acknowledges the financial contributions to the research programme by the governments of Denmark (Royal Ministry of Foreign Affairs), Finland (Ministry for Foreign Affairs), Sweden (Swedish International Development Cooperation Agency—Sida) and the United Kingdom (Department for International Development—DFID).
Format:
online

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