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UNU-WIDER WP/2012/06 Transitional Justice and Aid

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A teenager wears torn rubber boots in a muddy local market in Bac Ha, Viet Nam. As of 2005 figures, half the world population—more than 3 billion people–is estimated to live on less than USD 2.50 a day. Bac Ha, Viet Nam. UN Photo/Kibae Park.

Table of contents

WP/006 Transitional Justice and Aid

Research and Communication on Foreign Aid
This paper examines the current security–governance–development nexus, something that is often also discussed under the concept of ‘transitional justice’ (TJ). The paper analyses how the ambiguous, evolving and expanding nature of the concept of TJ affects the planning, coordination, evaluation and assessment of aid given to conflict ridden, post-conflict or (post) authoritarian societies in order to strengthen their democracy. Special attention is paid to gender justice. Illustrations are drawn mainly from Africa where many TJ processes and mechanisms are currently taking place.
Publisher:
UNU-WIDER
Series:
WIDER Working Paper
Volume:
2012/06
Title:
WP/006 Transitional Justice and Aid
Authors:
Sirkku K. Hellsten
Publication date:
January 2012
ISBN 13 Web:
978-92-9230-469-0
Copyright holder:
© UNU-WIDER
Copyright year:
2012
Keywords:
transitional justice, post-conflict reconstruction, development, social justice, human rights, development aid
JEL:
F5, O2, I3
Sponsor:
This working paper has been prepared within the UNU-WIDER project ‘Foreign Aid: Research and Communication (ReCom)’, directed by Tony Addison and Finn Tarp. UNU-WIDER gratefully acknowledges specific programme contributions from the governments of Denmark (Ministry of Foreign Affairs, Danida) and Sweden (Swedish International Development Cooperation Agency—Sida) for the Research and Communication (ReCom) programme. UNU-WIDER also acknowledges core financial support to UNU-WIDER’s work programme from the governments of Finland (Ministry for Foreign Affairs), the United Kingdom (Department for International Development), and the governments of Denmark and Sweden.
Format:
online

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