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UNU-WIDER Blind Spots on the Map of Aid Allocations: Concentration and Complementarity of International NGO Aid

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Blind Spots on the Map of Aid Allocations: Concentration and Complementarity of International NGO Aid

The budgets of development NGOs have risen dramatically over the last decades. In stark contrast to bilateral donors, the geographic choices of NGOs remain virtually unexplored. Using a new dataset and Lorenz curves, this paper shows that NGOs are very active in some countries and hardly active in others. A clustering of NGO activity takes place in UN-labelled high priority countries, but ample room for improved targeting exists. Aid concentration curves provide insight into whether NGOs target the same countries as bilateral donors. The article concludes that this is the case and that NGOs are thus acting as complements. The drawback of this complementary approach is that it reinforces the donor darling/donor orphan divide. The paper concludes with some research suggestions and preliminary policy implications.
Publisher:
UNU-WIDER
Series:
WIDER Research Paper
Volume:
2007/45
Title:
Blind Spots on the Map of Aid Allocations: Concentration and Complementarity of International NGO Aid
Authors:
Dirk-Jan Koch
Publication date:
August 2007
ISSN Web:
1810-2611
ISBN Web:
9291909882
ISBN 13 Web:
9789291909889
Copyright holder:
© UNU-WIDER
Copyright year:
2007
Keywords:
aid allocation, NGO, aid effectiveness, new geographical economics, donor darling
JEL:
O20
Project:
Conference on 'Aid: Principles, Policies and Performance'
Sponsor:
The governments of Denmark (Royal Ministry of Foreign Affairs), Finland (Ministry for Foreign Affairs), Norway (Royal Ministry of Foreign Affairs), Sweden (Swedish International Development Cooperation Agency-Sida) and the United Kingdom (Department for International Development).
Format:
online

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