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A teenager wears torn rubber boots in a muddy local market in Bac Ha, Viet Nam. As of 2005 figures, half the world population—more than 3 billion people–is estimated to live on less than USD 2.50 a day. Bac Ha, Viet Nam. UN Photo/Kibae Park.

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Seasonal Migration and Early Childhood Development

This paper provides unique evidence of the positive consequences of seasonal migration for investments in early childhood development. We analyse migration in a poor shock-prone border region in rural Nicaragua where it offers one of the main household income diversification and risk coping strategies. IV estimates show, somewhat surprisingly, that mother’s migration has a positive effect on early cognitive development. We attribute these findings to changes in income and to the intra-household empowerment gains resulting from mother’s migration, which offset potential negative ECD effects from temporary lack of parenting. This paper, hence, illustrates how increased opportunities in seasonal migration due to higher South–South mobility might positively affect early childhood development and as such long term poverty reduction.
Publisher:
UNU-WIDER
Series:
WIDER Research Paper
Volume:
2008/48
Title:
Seasonal Migration and Early Childhood Development
Authors:
Karen Macours and Renos Vakis
Publication date:
April 2008
ISSN Web:
1810-2611
ISBN 13 Web:
9789292300968
Copyright holder:
© UNU-WIDER
Copyright year:
2008
Keywords:
Nicaragua, migration, income, households
JEL:
O15, J61
Project:
Impact of Globalization on the World's Poor
Sponsor:
The governments of Denmark (Royal Ministry of Foreign Affairs), Finland (Ministry for Foreign Affairs), Norway (Royal Ministry of Foreign Affairs), Sweden (Swedish International Development Cooperation Agency—Sida) and the United Kingdom (Department for International Development).
Format:
online