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UNU-WIDER Assessing Vulnerability Before, During and After a Natural Disaster in Fragile Regions: Case Study of the 2004 Indian Ocean Tsunami in Sri Lanka and Indonesia

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Assessing Vulnerability Before, During and After a Natural Disaster in Fragile Regions: Case Study of the 2004 Indian Ocean Tsunami in Sri Lanka and Indonesia

Current approaches of measuring vulnerability to natural hazards generally use a rather static perspective that focuses on a single point in time—often before a hazardous event occurs. In contrast, the paper argues that vulnerability assessment should also take into account the changing dynamics during and after a disaster. This paper provides a comparative analysis of the situation in Sri Lanka and Indonesia within the context of the 2004 Indian Ocean tsunami. The author presents concepts for measuring revealed vulnerabilities and methods of assessing the recovery process, and highlights the differing ways in which the tsunami affected the ongoing civil conflicts in both regions.
Publisher:
UNU-WIDER
Series:
WIDER Research Paper
Volume:
2008/50
Title:
Assessing Vulnerability Before, During and After a Natural Disaster in Fragile Regions: Case Study of the 2004 Indian Ocean Tsunami in Sri Lanka and Indonesia
Authors:
Jörn Birkmann
Publication date:
May 2008
ISSN Web:
1810-2611
ISBN 13 Web:
9789292300982
Copyright holder:
© UNU-WIDER
Copyright year:
2008
Keywords:
vulnerability, dynamics, transition, natural hazards, fragile regions, Sri Lanka, Indonesia, coastal regions, tsunami
JEL:
Q54, I39
Project:
Fragility and Development
Sponsor:
UNU-WIDER gratefully acknowledges the financial contributions to the project by The Australian Agency for International Development (AusAID), the Finnish Ministry for Foreign Affairs, and the UK Department for International Development—DFID.
Format:
online

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