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UNU-WIDER A Two-thirds Rate of Success: Polish Transformation and Economic Development, 1989-2008

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A Two-thirds Rate of Success: Polish Transformation and Economic Development, 1989-2008

Progress in achieving institutional changes should be evaluated through the prism of their influence on the development abilities of the relevant country. In Poland, during 20 years of comprehensive systemic shift, GDP increased more than in any other postsocialist country. To judge the transformation progress, it is not enough to review improvements in competitiveness or in growth in terms of quantity, but also social and cultural aspects should be taken into account. In Poland, there have been five distinct periods from the viewpoint of economic growth. Had there been a better policy coordination of systemic change and socioeconomic development, GDP growth over the periods considered could have increased by more than half. This opportunity was missed because of the intermittent implementation of wrong economic policies based on wrong economic theories. Poland’s transformation can be seen as a success, but only to the extent of achieving two-thirds of its potential.
Publisher:
UNU-WIDER
Series:
WIDER Research Paper
Volume:
2009/14
Title:
A Two-thirds Rate of Success: Polish Transformation and Economic Development, 1989-2008
Authors:
Grzegorz W. Kolodko
Publication date:
March 2009
ISSN Web:
1810-2611
ISBN 13 Web:
9789292301835
Copyright holder:
© UNU-WIDER
Copyright year:
2009
Keywords:
transformation, economic growth, development, institutions, economic policy, postcommunist period, Poland
JEL:
A11, E6, F02, F43, H11, I38, N1, O17
Project:
Country Role Models for Development Success
Sponsor:
UNU-WIDER gratefully acknowledges the financial contribution to the project by the Finnish Ministry for Foreign Affairs, and the financial contributions to the research programme by the governments of Denmark (Royal Ministry of Foreign Affairs), Finland (Ministry for Foreign Affairs), Norway (Royal Ministry of Foreign Affairs), Sweden (Swedish International Development Cooperation Agency—Sida) and the United Kingdom (Department for International Development).
Format:
online

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