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UNU-WIDER The Omani and Bahraini Paths to Development: Rare and Contrasting Oil-based Economic Success Stories

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The Omani and Bahraini Paths to Development: Rare and Contrasting Oil-based Economic Success Stories

Oman and Bahrain are Middle Eastern success stories. There are some key similarities. Both have followed pragmatic development strategies built on a stable foundation of strengthened governance structures and enhanced economic liberalization. These improvements occurred in somewhat different settings, with Oman developing in a more authoritarian environment, whereas Bahrain enjoyed greater democracy but somewhat less stability. While both countries have relied on oil revenues to support their development efforts, it appears that, in contrast to their less successful oil producing neighbours, each country had just enough oil to do some good, but not enough to do serious damage.
Publisher:
UNU-WIDER
Series:
WIDER Research Paper
Volume:
2009/38
Title:
The Omani and Bahraini Paths to Development: Rare and Contrasting Oil-based Economic Success Stories
Authors:
Robert Looney
Publication date:
June 2009
ISSN Web:
1810-2611
ISBN 13 Web:
9789292302092
Copyright holder:
© UNU-WIDER
Copyright year:
2009
Keywords:
Oman, Bahrain, Middle East, GCC, economic development, economic growth, development strategies
JEL:
O53
Project:
Country Role Models for Development Success
Sponsor:
UNU-WIDER gratefully acknowledges the financial contributions to the project by the Finnish Ministry for Foreign Affairs, and the financial contributions to the research programme by the governments of Denmark (Royal Ministry of Foreign Affairs), Finland (Finnish Ministry for Foreign Affairs), Sweden (Swedish International Development Cooperation Agency—Sida) and the United Kingdom (Department for International Development).
Format:
online

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