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UNU-WIDER WP/2012/49 Donor Assistance and Urban Service Delivery in Africa

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WP/049 Donor Assistance and Urban Service Delivery in Africa

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Sub-Saharan African cities have been growing at historically unprecedented rates. Since the early 1970s, they have welcomed international assistance involving a succession of major thematic objectives. The main agency involved in urban assistance has been the World Bank. But as its goals have changed, it has been obliged to operate increasingly through a decentralized, more democratically structured local government system. Overall, the success of this international assistance regime has been positive but modest, given the overwhelming needs of African cities. Still, African cities are increasingly finding solutions both co-operatively and on their own.
Publisher:
UNU-WIDER
Series:
WIDER Working Paper
Volume:
2012/49
Title:
WP/049 Donor Assistance and Urban Service Delivery in Africa
Authors:
Richard Stren
Publication date:
May 2012
ISBN 13 Web:
978-92-9230-512-3
Copyright holder:
© UNU-WIDER
Copyright year:
2012
Keywords:
urban assistance, African cities, decentralization, World Bank, local government, urban management
JEL:
F35, H70, N47, O18
Sponsor:
This study has been prepared within the UNU-WIDER project on ‘Decentralization and Urban Service Delivery in Africa’, which is directed by Danielle Resnick and is a component of the larger UNU-WIDER programme ‘Foreign Aid: Research and Communication (ReCom)’. UNU-WIDER gratefully acknowledges specific programme contributions from the governments of Denmark (Ministry of Foreign Affairs, Danida) and Sweden (Swedish International Development Cooperation Agency—Sida) for the Research and Communication (ReCom) programme. UNU-WIDER also acknowledges core financial support to UNU-WIDER’s work programme from the governments of Finland (Ministry for Foreign Affairs), the United Kingdom (Department for International Development), and the governments of Denmark and Sweden.
Format:
online

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