Journal Special Issue
Involuntary Migration, Inequality, and Integration

Vietnamese and Afghan migrants in Canada, Germany, the UK, and the US

THIS COLLECTION OF ARTICLES IS ON EARLY VIEW. Migration is an inherent feature of human history. A rich literature considers the experiences of global migrants across diverse environments. This special issue explores such experiences with a focus on inequality between migrants and host populations in countries of settlement. 

It asks: why are economic inequalities between these populations deeper and more persistent in some situations than others? How has ‘integration’ in this sense varied across groups and contexts and over time? What factors contribute to such variation? What policies and programmes facilitate better and more equitable economic outcomes for migrants?

We approach these questions through focused and comparative study of two migrant populations (Vietnamese and Afghan) in four Western countries (Canada, Germany, the UK, and the US). We pay particular attention to involuntary migrants, who fled conflict in their home regions beginning in the 1970s–1980s.

Table of contents
  1. 1. Involuntary migration, inequality, and integration: National and subnational influences
    Rachel M. Gisselquist
    More Working Paper | Involuntary migration, inequality, and integration
  2. 2. Involuntary migration, context of reception, and social mobility: The case of Vietnamese refugee resettlement in the United States
    Carl L. Bankston and Min Zhou
    More Working Paper | Involuntary migration, context of reception, and social mobility
  3. 3. The resettlement of Vietnamese refugees across Canada over three decades
    Feng Hou
    More Working Paper | The resettlement of Vietnamese refugees across Canada over three decades
  4. 4. Differentiated embedding among the Vietnamese refugees in London and the UK: Fragmentation, complexity, and ‘in/visibility’
    Tamsin Barber
    More Working Paper | The integration of Vietnamese refugees in London and the UK
  5. 5. Competing contexts of reception in refugee and immigrant incorporation: Vietnamese in West and East Germany
    Frank Bösch and Phi Hong Su
    More Working Paper | Invisible, successful, and divided
  6. 6. Challenges to the economic integration of Afghan refugees in the US
    Carl Stempel and Qais Alemi
    More Working Paper | Economic integration of Afghan refugees in the US, 1980–2015
  7. 7. Settlement and labour force outcomes for Afghan immigrants and their children in Canada
    Ravi Pendakur
    More Working Paper | Settlement and labour force outcomes for Afghan immigrants and their children in Canada
  8. 8. The impact of educational achievement on the integration and wellbeing of Afghan refugee youth in the UK
    Catherine Gladwell
    More Working Paper | The impact of educational achievement on the integration and wellbeing of Afghan refugee youth in the UK
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